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What is Creeping Normality?

 , updated on September 27, 2016
Creeping normality is an objectionable change that is accepted because it occurs slowly. The term is often used to explain indifference to environmental change. For example, people may tolerate excessive smog in a particular city that worsens over decades. Such smog would be intolerable if it suddenly appeared but is accepted when people have time to adopt lower expectations for health and quality of life.
Overview: Creeping Normality
Type
Definition
A significant problem that is not taken seriously because it occurs slowly.
Examples
Gradual loss of legal rights such as privacy or freedom of speech.
Diseases that become commonplace over the course of a generation due to changes in lifestyle and diet.
Excessive increases in the cost of essential services such as education.
Related Concepts

Cognitive Biases

This is the complete list of articles we have written about cognitive biases.
Ambiguity Effect
Anchoring
Backfire Effect
Base Rate
Biased
Biases
Circular Reasoning
Cognitive Bias
Cognitive Dissonance
Complexity Bias
Crab Mentality
Creeping Normality
Curse Of Knowledge
Decoy Effect
Ethnocentrism
Exposure Effect
False Analogy
False Hope
Fear Of Youth
Gambler's Fallacy
Golden Hammer
Halo Effect
Hindsight Bias
Negativity Bias
Optimism Bias
Peak-End Rule
Positive Bias
Sour Grapes
Survivorship Bias
Us vs Them
Victim Mentality
Wishful Thinking
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Cognitive Biases

A list of common cognitive biases explained.

Curse Of Knowledge

Why experts have trouble communicating.

Optimism Bias

An overview of optimism bias, including its surprising benefits.

Decoy Effect

A cognitive bias that is well known in marketing circles.

Biases vs Heuristics

The difference between biases and heuristics.

Information Cascade

A definition of information cascade with examples.

Functional Fixedness

A definition of functional fixedness with examples.

Anecdotal Evidence

The definition of anecdotal evidence with examples.

Scientism

The definition of scientism with examples.

Business Risks

A list of common business risks.

Risk Treatment

The four things that can be done about risk.

Risk Mitigation

A list of techniques for reducing risk.

Positive Risk

The potential that you'll achieve too much of a good thing.

Dread Risk

Any risk that people have a strong aversion too.

Risk vs Opportunity

The surprising similarities between risk and opportunity.

Risk Management vs Contingency Planning

The difference between risk management and contingency planning.

Uncertainty

The common types of uncertainty in decision making and strategy.

Inventory Risk

The common types of inventory risk.

Business Risk Management

An overview of common business risk management techniques.
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